Nahuel Sanchez

A place to write down what I discover and learn everyday at my workplace. Front-end may be the main topic, but who knows, probably I'll be publishing something else.

You're looking at all the posts published under the tag eCommerce.
← Go back to the front page

Do not forget about the emotions while selling something

I'm selling two iPhone X, Space Gray color, both with 256 GB of capacity. When I bought them I wasn't sure about getting the 64 GB version or the bigger one, but I made up my mind in favor of the 256 GB version and I'll tell you why it was a great decision.

Last year I went on a family trip with my mom and sister to a Brazilian beach where cellular signal wasn't available all the time, meaning LTE was a luxury, and also finding WiFi was a Tom Cruise's "Mission Impossible" remake possible plot.

In this scenario, the idea of today's about everything being in the cloud and not in the physical devices was a no go for me.

The trip was beyond great. I spent a lot of time in the water with my sister trying to record the best slow motion videos: sometimes trying with just the water, sometimes filming the sand to see if that improves the video, then letting my sister try some tricks in front of the iPhone camera over and over again until we get something good.

At the end of the day we ended up with many many GB of videos, and a job not done yet. Before dinner, all nights, and most of the times waiting for our mom to get ready, we selected the best shots in order to create a video, cinematic music included, to show to mom as if we were two Directors showing the final cut of a Hollywood movie to a film criticism.

The other phone, while exactly the same, it was just used for some work stuff. It's a great device for reading emails, writing emails, and taking notes.

The difference lies in the emotions

While both are the same technical speaking, they are not the same emotionally speaking. If I still need to prove my point I'll will continue telling you fake stories including a beach, a mom and a sister until your eyes get wet and you rip this phone out of my hand while letting me keep the one used for work... because that's the whole point.

I know it's very obvious I'm appealing to your emotions in the last story, but the true is that we're all victims of this trick in a regular basis.

Think about it. Think about the last time you bough something on Amazon, eBay or Mercado Libre, when you searched for a product you already knew, ended up with three or four browser tabs with similar publications of the same product, different price within a short range, and then you made a decision from where to buy based on not much logical data but confidence on the seller, the aspect of the website, the fact that one had a better description with a video of real people using the product, the fact that one had reviews from previous buyers.

Think in Coke showing a couple jumping of a cliff into a lake, McDonald's showing a single mom with his kid laughing while eating fries, a perfume showing a good looking guy with three Victoria's Secret angels.

I remember a local ad I often see on TV showing a divided screen where on the left you can see a cute lady getting ready to go out on a sunny day, and on the other side a big man wearing a hood and preparing his tools to break into the house of this lady the moment she step out. There you have the victim, the villain, the conflict... and the hero? A trustworthy armored door at an accessible price.

And Apple?, oh, boy, those guys really know everything about selling feelings instead of products. I remember during an Apple's Keynote somebody, probably Tim Cook, introduced "Live Photos" (you know, that feature that records a few seconds before and after an static photo) and said something like "This feature allows you to see a photo, gently press on the screen, and get a sneak peak of what was going on during the shot of that static image".

A time machine that shows you 3 seconds of video and audio around the static shot. Right in the feels.

What you're selling is a hero

Your product, service, software... whatever is the thing you're selling, it can be the hero of a story. A story where there's a problem your potential customer has.

The problem is the villain in the story you need to start telling. It can be pretty obvious like in the ad for the armored door, or very subtle like in the McDonald's ad where they tell that they know how hard it is to being a single mom but still you can come upon great moments with your son in their stores.

Spot the villain, disclose the problematic, then introduce the hero to your customer so they lived happily ever after.

About how hard it is to find a front end developer capable of work with Magento

Is it hard to find someone willing (and able?) to work with Magento. And I'm not talking about finding an already "senior" Magento front end developer with n years of experience with that eCommerce platform and/or working in that specific field.

No. What I mean is that it is difficult to find someone who is already a front end developer but never worked with Magento. Will he be able to? Will he understand and like the platform? Is he willing to despite what he says during the interview?

I already write a post about how to interview a front end developer, and I'm not sure if I strengthened enough the idea of it being a kind of a bet. In this scenario we're betting twice as we not only need to discover if the person being interviewed possesses the skills to be a good developer but also if he or she can perform with a specific platform.

That fuzzy line between back end and front end within Magento

I encountered a lot of different "profiles" while interviewing. While the spectrum is really broad let me summarize this into two groups (nevertheless, not sure about the names I'm giving to them, but bear with me):

  • Web designers, or people focused only on the HTML and CSS (maybe jQuery?) part of the coding process. People whose main task is to convert a given PSD file into "a web".
  • Developers using the "hard tools" for coding complex logical solutions with, and not limited to, JavaScript and all its modern flavours.

The first group is excellent in that PSD to xHTML conversion process but they sort of depend on somebody to add the functionality to their creations, and the later group fails when the QA team compares what they delivered with the original design files.

So, someone in between, right? Right. But why?, because of that fuzzy line between back end and front end within Magento. :)

It depends on how the company you work for is structurated, and how the roles for back end and front end are implemented there, but under my experience I can tell that none of these groups that represents the two extremes of the wide range of developers I interview can work with Magento, or at least they can't on their own as they will always lack what the other groups knows... and we need both on the front end side of a Magento project for it to go live.

Again, under my experience, while working with people that falls into this two categories I either faced the problem of things looking good but not working as expected, or things that do what they're are supposed to do but with so many differences when I open the designs (and if you are thinking "it's only colors", think responsive web design).

How we find that "in between"?

Spoiler alert: I don't know for sure, but I can tell you what I'm doing right now and hopefully it will help you achieve the same as I'm looking for if you're conduction interviews.

I recently had a meeting with somebody from the recruiting team at the company I work for in order to polish the "mechanism" to identify people too attached to the mentioned groups in order to dismiss them at the beginning of the process, and there are a lot of hints in the candidate's CV that you can use.

Exhibit A is this imaginary resume that includes skills such as HTML, CSS, SASS and jQuery, which is excellent because we need those skills. Following we find a lot of background experience building corporate websites only, but never using a CMS as there is no mention for WordPress, Joomla, Drupal, or similar.

Finally, the work experience is a mix of marketing and design, mostly a transition from the later to a developer. The court rules guilty for being too much of a member of the web designers group.

A second example is this also imaginary resume that includes all the fancy words I already used to, such as Angular, AngularJS, React, VUE, Node... you name it... and a background experience that mostly includes working on the back end side of some sites.

I don't have to tell you to which group this imaginary candidate belongs to.

So, again, someone in between. Find that resume that have a mix of the trending topic's keywords for the first and second group, and you got yourself a feasible Magento front end developer. Or work the other way around: burn the resumes that falls into the extremes and what lays in the middle is the people you should interview next.

No group is better than the other

Don't get me wrong... or let me clarify.

I do not think one group is better than the other one, and if you belong to the first one there's no obligation to learn what the other group knows, neither the other way around.

Let me put another short perspective into this: if the company you work for (or the company you applied for, or your company if you happens to have one) really separates this two groups into really two separates job positions, and if you only have to worry about the PSD to xHTML thing because somebody else is handling the functionality... good for you, and go for it, as again this depends on the scenario you're standing.

That's why I mentioned something about the way a company is structured before, because in some places you might not need to worry about the "in between" as it doesn't apply.

Happy hunting.